Bugle Was a Purple Roadside Weed

A beautifully deep shade of purple drew my attention to the flowers of Bugle. A new spring roadside weed for me!

Spikes of deep purple stood less than a foot tall but the color was so vivid that the shade of the nearby trees didn’t hide these weeds growing by a two-lane road next to the creek.

Purple spikes of Bugle grow next to a country road.
Purple spikes of Bugle grow next to a country road.
With a cluster of purple spikes one can see how this plant would look nice at the edge of a garden.
With a cluster of purple spikes one can see how this plant would look nice at the edge of a garden.

Bugle, Ajuga reptans, is alien to America and native to Europe, but you can find it growing wild in America along roadsides because it has escaped from gardens. Bugle’s tendency to form mats could make it an undesirable alien if not an invasive one.

Another common name for bugle is bugleweed, but that’s not to be confused with Bugleweed, Lycopus virginicus, a very different-looking herb native to North America that has some medicinal qualities.

Looking down on Bugle you can see how the flowers tower over the oval leaves.
Looking down on Bugle you can see how the flowers tower over the oval leaves.

Several flowers grow in the leaf axils. Flower shape is tubular and the lower central lip is long and gracefully cleft.

Read moreBugle Was a Purple Roadside Weed