Wild Ginger and Pedro

The Wild Ginger has made a nice comeback from last year. The roots are sprouting up twice as many plants and the flowers that hug the ground are beginning to bloom. The rounded, heart-shaped leaves are still somewhat crinkley.

Wild ginger is a native perennial with a unique flower that sits on the ground.
Wild ginger is a native perennial with a unique flower that sits on the ground.

The wild ginger was obtained from a native plant conference that will take place again at Millersville University, June 2 and 3, 2006. The native plant sale is open to the public and it is a great place to talk with other native plant enthusiasts.

The mimosa trees are just now starting to show their buds. They must be one of the last to wake up from winter.

Lily-of-the-Valley plants are up and their flowers are formed, but not yet open. Can’t wait to take a whiff of these lovely perennials!

Lily-of-the-Valley has showy white flowers and a wonderful scent, too!
Lily-of-the-Valley has showy white flowers and a wonderful scent, too!

To my dismay I found at least one Eastern Hemlock tree is infected with the dreaded wooly adelgid. A couple hemlocks deeper in the woods are apparently not yet infected, but this tree that shows the telltale white blobs on the underside of small branches certainly is. I suspect the traffic that passes by the infected tree may have had a hand in bringing the pests to it. This hemlock sits next to the farmer’s lane that the farmer uses to reach a field adjacent to our property. Pickup trucks, four-wheelers, sprayers, tractors and combines have all passed by and who knows where else they’ve been.

The white blobs on the underside of the Eastern Hemlock branches are Wooly Adelgid pests.
The white blobs on the underside of the Eastern Hemlock branches are Wooly Adelgid pests.

My Wild False Indigo has taken three years from seed to get this far. I can’t wait to see it blooming!

Wild False Indigo started from a planted seed three years ago.
Wild False Indigo started from a planted seed three years ago.

In my walk around the property today I spotted someone watching me. Pedro! No, the farmer doesn’t employ any illegal aliens, but that is the name I have given the yellow and white tabby cat that must be one of the barn cats. Can you spot Pedro?

Pedro watching me watching him.
Pedro watching me watching him.

2 thoughts on “Wild Ginger and Pedro

  1. Nice web page! Very sharp. The posts on this blog are right on target. Can’t wait for some more posts.Keep on blogging.

  2. Thanks for your encouraging input, Florida! Maybe you’d like to comment on what part of the state you are from – North or South FL? What is blooming in your neck of the woods?

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